archiemcphee:

Remember those outrageously cute Banana Bird capsule toys we posted about a couple week ago? Meet their kawaii canine counterparts: Bread Dogs. Bandai created this adorable new series of Gashapon toys, which is actually their fifth series of Doggy Bread figures to date. (Click here to view them all)

This new Anicolla series features six different, but equally darling dogs who’ve found themselves wearing six different sorts of bread. There’s the Anpug (a pug inside a sweet bean bun), the Pomcutlet Sandwich (a pomeranian who’s taken the place of a katsu pork cutlet), a toy poodle pancake, corgi hot dog, shih tzu sandwich and, last but not least, the Chihuassant (an amazing Chihuahua-croissant hybrid). Despite being less than two inches long, each figure is impressively detailed and, yes, ridiculously cute.

Don’t worry if you haven’t got any capsule toy machines nearby. Right now you can find these little cuties on Ebay.

[via RocketNews24]

doxiequeen1:

I don’t like short dresses. I can’t seem to control my expression and legs at the same time, the photos always turn out a mess :( 

Anyway! Flower dress and headpiece are all finished, step by step instructions for this dress can be found on my blog, and a video tutorial for the headpiece is here

The whole thing is sheer, but you can’t really tell because the petticoat is white and i’m very pale ;;

It was designed, drafted, made, and worn by me! Took 16-ish hours to make, spread over a seven day period. Has about sixty dollars worth of fake flowers in it and several yards of silk organza, poly chiffon, and tulle.

I was a fun and easy little project. I enjoyed it.

(via discount-transorbital-lobotomy)

hobbitballerina:

chelseawelseyknight:

witchesbitchesandbritches:

lifeundefeated:

Yea it’s clearly our “generation that’s making homosexuality a trend.” Seriously, pisses me off when people say that. look at this! It’s always been around, it’s not a trend, it’s real. It’s beautiful.

These are really beautiful images.

This makes me really happy

There’s a long history of lesbian-like activity in the West.  In the 19th century US, especially after the Civil War killed off so many young men, middle-class and other genteel girls were encouraged in Boston marriages — relationships with other women of similar educational and class backgrounds.  Since women were considered naturally chaste and disinterested in sex, these love affairs were seen as innocent and spiritual.  Women’s lives were wholly separate from men’s that young women infrequently had male friends who weren’t considered a marriage prospect.  They were encouraged to keep to all-female social circles, and the advent of women’s colleges further encouraged that.  Women were expected to mentor each other, love each other, dance with each other, with the older woman acting as the cavalier, the man in the relationship, protecting and guiding the younger, pursuing her and courting her in ways not unlike how young men would court their brides.  But the prevailing cultural wisdom was that these relationships would be limited to kisses and poetry — women were incapable of sexual desire, they tolerated sex in heterosexual marriages because men were sex-driven beasts who demanded it of them.  Without a man, it was presumed that these relationships would be chaste, innocent, and wholly emotional.  Lesbian-like behaviour is most tolerated when women are perceived as less sexual than men.  Homosexual behaviour becomes threatening when sex is involved — when, in the 1920s, women were seen as able to have sexual drives and the idea of sexually companionable marriages came onto the landscape, Boston marriages suddenly became unnatural and disgusting because they directed women’s sexual interests towards other women instead of to the proper channels: towards men.  The flapper was all about the sexually available (to men) young woman.  She contributed to the demise of widely accepted lesbian or lesbian-like relationships.  As soon as the flapper was capable of wanting sex herself instead of tolerating it from her male partner, lesbian/lesbian-like relationships were threatening, deviant, and ruined young women’s chances to become good wives and mothers.

So remember this as you look at the pre-1920s images.  Those women were allowed these passionate loves, even encouraged in them (sometimes after they managed to get a husband, Eleanor Roosevelt in particular), all because the patriarchy was convinced that women weren’t capable of sexual feelings towards one another.  As long as women were seen as desexed, as creatures of sentiment and emotion instead of passion and desire, lesbianism wasn’t a threat.  The minute women were regarded by patriarchal culture as having a natural sex drive, lesbian-like behaviour became deviant and damning.

We didn’t invent homosexuality in the past 20 or 30 or 50 years.  But we continue to labour under the belief and cultural expectation that women’s sexuality is something owed to and owned by men, forever de-legitimising women’s relationships unless men in some way benefit. 

(Source: babycocodill, via arsvivendi)